Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Lunch at Bear Pit BBQ by Andrea Kirk

Lamb sandwich on garlic toast
The Bear Pit has been around forever and draws a big crowd for their wood smoked meats with tangy "Missouri" style sauce. They even have lamb and duck in addition to typical bbq pork and beef.

Their sandwiches on garlic toast are very tasty - my favorite is the lamb. The chicken is my favorite for dinner - it is crispy and smoky and they don't sauce it up - you can add the sauce yourself. Use their regular sauce though, I like it better than the sweet sauce they serve with the chicken.

Sawdust on the floor, wooden tables and an outdoor patio provide the old school bbq joint ambiance
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The crispy quarter chicken makes a great light lunch.  The half chicken dinner is my favorite thing on the menu here.  It is basically wood smoked chicken that is finished in the fryer. I don't know any place making anything like this.


The Bear Pit
10825 Sepulveda Boulevard,
Mission Hills, CA 91345
(818) 365-2509
Website

What's to do Nearby:
San Fernando Valley CALENDAR
Mission San Fernando Rey De Espana
Nethercutt Museums

Thursday, August 1, 2013

A MIDSUMMER EVENING - PRESHOW AT THE THEATRICUM BOTANICUM

A summer evening at the Theatricum Botanicum is a delightfully bucolic theatrical experience in the woods of Topanga Canyon.  But sometimes you doo need to watch your step.

video


THE SECOND MOUNTING OF ‘JUDAS ISCARIOT’ IS A GODSEND Review by M.R. Hunter

 
There is a god in the L.A. theater community and his name is Josh T. Ryan. A founding member of Zombie Joe’s Underground, Ryan brings an ambitiously fresh, determined sensibility as the newly appointed director to Breedlove Productions’ second staging of “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot” and raises an otherwise would-be Lazarus from the dead.
 
It’s rare for a show to experience a transfiguration after its initial reception received less than stellar reviews, (*earning a tepid 66% Bittersweet on the Los Angeles theater review aggregate website Bitter-Lemons.com). Aided by a clearer vision unrestrained by moodier nuances, Ryan reframes a courtroom set in an urban barrio of Purgatory into a timely, poignant, sardonic discourse on matters of faith, forgiveness, brotherhood, and self-persecution.